Helensville Museum’s Children’s Day

by Helen Martin

Splendidly dressed volunteers Isla Willis and Judy Lloyd (Museum Committee Secretary).

Splendidly dressed volunteers Isla Willis and Judy Lloyd (Museum Committee Secretary).

The weather gods conspired against the annual Helensville & District Historical Society’s annual Children’s Day held at the museum precinct in Mill Road in early October. There were gusty winds and intermittent showers early on, but for those who did brave the weather there was plenty to see and do and the sun did appear in the afternoon.
There was an atmosphere of days gone by, as volunteers in period costume were on hand to answer questions and explain some of the history of early European settlement. Families had the chance to listen to story-telling and see carders, spinners and knitters practising their craft in the pioneer house, while Denise Marshall’s carving group and members of Norwest Wood turners were on hand to show off their expertise with wood.
There were plenty of the activities our ancestors enjoyed for kids and their parents to have a go at, including making paper snowflakes, flowers, placemats and dolls, putting together a snazzy sand saucer and tossing horseshoes.

Volunteers Holly Ryan (market organiser) and Lynn Millar (Museum Office Administrator) with committee members Leigh Bosch and Isla Willis.

Volunteers Holly Ryan (market organiser) and Lynn Millar (Museum Office Administrator) with committee members Leigh Bosch and Isla Willis.

A treasure quiz around the museum added to the fun and there were several market stalls selling a good variety of food and drink.

Families enjoyed the wood turning demonstrations in Hec’s Shed.

Families enjoyed the wood turning demonstrations in Hec’s Shed.

Thanks to all the volunteers whose hard work leading up to the event and on the day brought some of the history of our little town to life.

Demonstrations of knitting, carding and spinning showed how it was done in ‘the old days’.

Demonstrations of knitting, carding and spinning showed how it was done in ‘the old days’.

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